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‘Confusing’ Park Ridge street signs replaced

New street signs at Park Ridge's six corners intersection in Uptown have replaced signs installed earlier this summer that contained arrows.  |  Jennifer Johnson/Sun-Times Media
Park Ridge Mayor David Schmidt believes new street signs at Park Ridge's six-corners intersection in Uptown are confusing to drivers. | Jennifer Johnson/Sun-Times Media
New street signs at Park Ridge's six corners intersection in Uptown have replaced signs installed earlier this summer that contained arrows.  |  Jennifer Johnson/Sun-Times Media

New street signs installed this summer at two busy Park Ridge intersections have been replaced just two weeks after the city’s mayor called them too confusing for drivers.

The green reflective signs, installed by the Illinois Department of Transportation at the six corners intersections in Uptown and in South Park, had contained the names of each street as well as arrows pointing in angled directions. On Sept. 4, they were replaced with new signs that contain only the street names, no arrows.

“They’re better,” Mayor David Schmidt said of the new signs. “I still think they’re a little confusing, but not as confusing as they were before.”

Schmidt shared his objections to the arrowed signs at the Touhy Avenue, Prospect Avenue and Northwest Highway intersection during an Aug. 19 Committee of the whole meeting, saying the arrows were not pointing to any particular streets. One sign for Prospect Avenue, located at the corner of the Shops of Uptown development, included an arrow pointing down in the direction of Northwest Highway.

Jim Boratyn, a community liaison for IDOT who was present during the meeting, said he brought the mayor’s concerns to IDOT engineers who met with city staff. In the end, the engineers opted to replace the signs not only in Uptown, but at the Devon Avenue, Talcott Road and Courtland Avenue crossing in South Park as well.

The signs are still posted with one street name above the other, and Schmidt believes this hasn’t solved the problem of clearly identifying the location of each individual street.

“For people who don’t know that area, it may still confuse them a little bit, but not as much as the old ones,” he said.

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